Penn Medicine News Blog Archive: Women's Health

Hold Your Preemie Close: It’s Just the Right “Medicine”

By Sally Sapega | May 25, 2015 | Comments IMG_2788

While advanced technology saves the lives of many preemies, studies have shown that the most basic of all care -- simply holding the baby –may have the biggest impact of all. New moms of full-term babies at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania are strongly encouraged to hold their... Read more

Individual Stories, Global Impact

By Olivia Fermano | May 7, 2015 | Comments HWHC_1

If there is a prominent reason for a woman to be grateful she lives in the 21st century, it’s health care. Over a dozen speakers – scholars from the humanities and health care professionals – gathered at Pennsylvania Hospital last week to help illustrate this fact at the 10th Annual... Read more

Making Medical Research Mobile

By Katie Delach | April 1, 2015 | Comments image from http://s3.amazonaws.com/hires.aviary.com/k/mr6i2hifk4wxt1dp/15040113/56814248-cde0-44eb-bca0-1dcd63be708d.png

In the laundry list of things you can do with a few swipes or taps of your finger – create a grocery list, conduct banking transactions, and track your daily workout – researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine are partnering with software developers to help create mobile apps aimed... Read more

Removing Barriers to Breast Cancer Care

By Olivia Fermano | February 13, 2015 | Comments image from http://s3.amazonaws.com/hires.aviary.com/k/mr6i2hifk4wxt1dp/15021321/9c9ef157-fe05-4d2c-85e5-28de26e2480c.png

I overheard a breast cancer patient once say: There is only one thing worse than having cancer – not being able to afford it. Sobering. Financial cost remains a barrier to cancer screenings - let alone cancer treatment - among lower income women. While multiple factors contribute to racial and... Read more

Beyond Cancer: When Both Parents Hold BRCA, a New Risk Can Emerge

By Karen Kreeger | January 14, 2015 | Comments Greenberg Cancer Discovery blog post image

Greenberg Cancer Discovery blog post imageMany families are acutely aware that BRCA1 and BRCA2 are the most important breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility genes. But recently a team including researchers at Penn Medicine discovered another risk it can pose in cancer patients when both parents carry the mutation. Read more

The New Nightingale

By Olivia Fermano | January 8, 2015 | Comments Deb Ferrarello_1

The image of the nurse is synonymous with hospitals and doctors’ offices. But in 2015, that sure is one old school point of view. Today’s nurses defy old stereotypes. Both male and female, many earn multiple advanced degrees, working out of uniform and beyond the bedside to all areas of... Read more

50 Years of Miracles on 34th Street

By Katie Delach | December 26, 2014 | Comments image from http://s3.amazonaws.com/hires.aviary.com/k/mr6i2hifk4wxt1dp/14122416/9b0adaa5-5880-4458-9dcb-f61373b68859.png

This year, Penn Fertility Care (PFC) celebrated its 50th anniversary, and as part of that, we’re reflecting on how the program has grown and how our Penn fertility experts have helped couples create and grow their families for decades. Penn's team of reproductive endocrinologists helped pioneer the development of new... Read more

When Sentiment Overcomes Reason

By Olivia Fermano | December 23, 2014 | Comments Mehta-Rima

We humans, we’re definitely a sentimental lot. Some might even argue that is one of the key traits that separate us from other animals – our desire to acquire mementos of life’s experiences. We sure do treasure our keepsakes, those tangible tokens of endearment to commemorate a special time, person... Read more

Celebrating Women in Science

By Karen Kreeger | November 20, 2014 | Comments Women in science pic larger

Recently, the New York Times published the provocative op-ed, “Academic Science Isn’t Sexist,” which described a soon-to-be-published study that found that experiences of young and midcareer women in math-intensive fields are, for the most part, similar to those of their male counterparts in terms of hiring, pay, tenure and promotion,... Read more

Sending Love and Hope

By Olivia Fermano | October 15, 2014 | Comments ICN baby PAH

After only seven weeks of being pregnant, Keri Heickert’s life as she knew it was no longer. Hers was a difficult pregnancy. In the fall of 2012 at only 20 weeks along, Keri – who was carrying fraternal twin girls – was admitted to monitored bed rest in Pennsylvania Hospital’s... Read more

The Future of Telemedicine is Here

By Katie Delach | October 9, 2014 | Comments image from http://s3.amazonaws.com/hires.aviary.com/k/mr6i2hifk4wxt1dp/14101416/dea91fca-1943-42dc-a0fe-b26e31c313e0.png

Over the past 20 years, advancements in research and the understanding of genetics have created a boom in patient demand for genetic tests. According to the National Library of Medicine, less than 300 genetic tests were available in the 1990s; in contrast, at the end of 2012, almost 3,000 genetic... Read more

The Deafening Silence of Ovarian Cancer

By Katie Delach | September 10, 2014 | Comments image from http://s3.amazonaws.com/hires.aviary.com/k/mr6i2hifk4wxt1dp/14091020/af1fcd35-8dd8-4b4b-9f58-771cbbc5611c.png

It’s called a “silent killer” because it doesn’t announce its presence. There is no chest pain or difficulty breathing like there is with lung cancer. You won’t have mood swings or nausea like you might with brain cancer. The most noticeable early symptoms of ovarian cancer might be as simple... Read more

Penn Gynecologist Collaborates with Her Sister to Explore the “Wild West” of Reproductive Medicine

By Olivia Fermano | September 2, 2014 | Comments Wanda Ronner_Margaret Marsh

Billy the Kid. Jesse James. Buffalo Bill. Wild Bill Hickok. We’ve all heard the names before: They’re the colorful and dangerous characters of America’s old “wild west” that have dominated U.S. cinema and television for decades. And that is where the connotations of entertainment end. Today, whenever an emerging trend... Read more

To Examine or Not to Examine? That is the Question

By Olivia Fermano | July 18, 2014 | Comments Gearhart-Peter

The field of medicine has a funny way of contradicting itself. Not that it’s on purpose, mind you. Thanks to rapid-fire advances in technology and new research discoveries, medicine is in a constant state of flux, always evolving. Think about it…20 years ago, fat was the dietary demon to avoid... Read more

Exploring the Human Microbiome

By John Shea | July 2, 2014 | Comments PENN-Med_SPRING_2014_F3b_LR-1

Like many people, I have gone through life without paying much attention to my gut –- except, that is, for the times my stomach gave unmistakable indications that it was upset. Most of the time, what was happening inside said stomach remained unknown. On the whole, it was out of... Read more

Butts Triplets Take Public Health Care by Storm

By Katie Delach | May 28, 2014 | Comments image from http://s3.amazonaws.com/hires.aviary.com/k/mr6i2hifk4wxt1dp/14052718/68f9a845-a4f1-461b-a4d0-dab363c5fcef.png

L to R: Samantha, Sydney and Heather Butts When Samantha, Sydney and Heather Butts were kids, they, like many others, went to school, took piano lessons, and dreamed of what they might become when they grew up. Nothing special, right? Their parents, Dr. Hugh and Mrs. Clementine Butts, raised their... Read more

Cycling for Rare Diseases

By Karen Kreeger | May 1, 2014 | Comments image from http://s3.amazonaws.com/hires.aviary.com/k/mr6i2hifk4wxt1dp/14061615/ea083ced-d221-4295-800d-0e745dcaf7ba.png

The first annual Million Dollar Bike Ride is finally here. On Saturday, May 3, 2014, close to 500 riders and many other volunteers and family members will gather at Highline Park on Penn’s campus to raise funds for and awareness about rare diseases. Read more

“Technology and Pearls” – The Dichotomy of Women and Medicine throughout History

By Olivia Fermano | April 7, 2014 | Comments HWHC_2014_2

In the 19th Century, rigorous work was thought to negatively affect female fertility. It was also thought to create a masculine and angular appearance in women, thus stunting the development of femininity. These are just a sample of some of the startling yet fascinating “facts” presented by ten distinguished speakers... Read more

Twenty Years Later: How Breast Cancer Risk Genes are Changing Patient Care

By Katie Delach | April 1, 2014 | Comments image from http://hires.aviary.com/k/mr6i2hifk4wxt1dp/14040116/c3cea997-611f-46a2-b57c-3346cde4ae63.png

In the mid-1990s, scientists for the first time were able to isolate and clone the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, mutations in which were thought to increase susceptibility to early onset breast and ovarian cancers. A new Perspective published last week in Science takes a look back at the last twenty... Read more

New Art Installation Illustrates DNA Repair and Celebrates Hope for Patients and Families Carrying BRCA Mutations

By Katie Delach | March 13, 2014 | Comments image from http://aviary.blob.core.windows.net/k-mr6i2hifk4wxt1dp-14031319/5098170c-9d55-401c-a571-bb9bc6ebc5c8.png

Penn Medicine's Basser Research Center for BRCA Unveils Homologous Hope Sculpture On Wednesday, the University of Pennsylvania’s Basser Research Center for BRCA hosted a special event to formally unveil “Homologous Hope,” a new sculpture suspended from the glass atrium in the Perelman Center for Advanced Medicine. The large-scale piece was... Read more

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