Penn Medicine News Blog Archive: Translational Research

Liver Regeneration Revealed: Hepatocytes Beget Hepatocytes

By Karen Kreeger | September 11, 2014 | Comments Prometheus Karl-Ludwig Poggemann Flickr

The regenerating liver is center stage in a modern story about how science similarly reinvents and readjusts itself, with a paper out in an early September issue of Cell Stem Cell from the lab of Ben Stanger. Read more

Double Trouble: How Parasitic Worms Weaken Antiviral Immunity

By Karen Kreeger | September 5, 2014 | Comments Artis CM cover warhol worms Sept 14

David Artis, PhD, professor of Microbiology and his team, including first author Lisa Osborne, PhD, demonstrated that mice already infected with parasitic helminths were worse at fighting viral infection. Read more

What’s the Real Target for Attacking Pancreatic Tumors?

By Karen Kreeger | June 11, 2014 | Comments Pancreatic cancer ribbon

The lab of Ben Stanger, MD, PhD, assistant professor of Medicine in the Division of Gastroenterology, and colleagues, recently showed in a Cancer Cell study that some tumor components, particularly fibroblasts, constrain tumor growth. Read more

2014 Philadelphia Science Festival Recap

By Karen Kreeger | May 20, 2014 | Comments

It’s only been a little over two weeks since the end of the 2014 Philadelphia Science Festival, but the inspiration, as well as love and knowledge of science that Penn Medicine faculty, staff, and students shared with members of the public, will last far into the next year.

Cycling for Rare Diseases

By Karen Kreeger | May 1, 2014 | Comments image from http://s3.amazonaws.com/hires.aviary.com/k/mr6i2hifk4wxt1dp/14061615/ea083ced-d221-4295-800d-0e745dcaf7ba.png

The first annual Million Dollar Bike Ride is finally here. On Saturday, May 3, 2014, close to 500 riders and many other volunteers and family members will gather at Highline Park on Penn’s campus to raise funds for and awareness about rare diseases. Read more

Using the Penn High Performance Computing Cluster to Unravel the Spider’s Web

By Karen Kreeger | April 15, 2014 | Comments Golden Silk Orb Weaver L Church Flickr Creative Commons

Uncovering the genomic architecture of spider silk genes wasn’t top of mind for Benjamin Voight, PhD, when he first came to Penn a few years ago. But he and postdoctoral researcher Paul Babb are now deep into sequencing the whole genomes of two spider species: a Golden Silk Orb Weaver and Darwin's Bark Spider. Read more

Twenty Years Later: How Breast Cancer Risk Genes are Changing Patient Care

By Katie Delach | April 1, 2014 | Comments image from http://hires.aviary.com/k/mr6i2hifk4wxt1dp/14040116/c3cea997-611f-46a2-b57c-3346cde4ae63.png

In the mid-1990s, scientists for the first time were able to isolate and clone the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, mutations in which were thought to increase susceptibility to early onset breast and ovarian cancers. A new Perspective published last week in Science takes a look back at the last twenty... Read more

Transcription Factors Key to Using T Cells Against Cancer, Chronic Infection

By Karen Kreeger | March 6, 2014 | Comments Wherry BATF spiral blog post Mar 14

Business is brisk in the lab of John Wherry and his team from the Department of Microbiology and the Institute for Immunology for papers on killer and helper T cells. Two studies -- bound by their focus on transcription factors important in the immune response – have come out of the lab in the last few weeks. And, they both identify potential new targets for cancer immunotherapies. Read more

A Rare-fied Friday at the End of Every February

By Karen Kreeger | February 27, 2014 | Comments image from http://aviary.blob.core.windows.net/k-mr6i2hifk4wxt1dp-14030517/8e9c0f27-2e6d-453a-9c54-f890d88b9907.png

Rare Disease Day is an annual event to raise awareness with the general public and decision-makers about rare diseases and their impact on patients’ lives. Read more

Cancer in Waiting: Latency in Viral-Based Cancer Explained

By Karen Kreeger | February 18, 2014 | Comments image from http://aviary.blob.core.windows.net/k-mr6i2hifk4wxt1dp-14030517/22827cb4-f309-4eb4-8f67-c99412eeb936.png

The lab of Erle Robertson, Ph.D., professor of Microbiology, and program leader of Tumor Virology at Penn’s Abramson Cancer Center, has been studying how Kaposi’s Sarcoma-associated Herpes Virus (KSHV) subverts normal cell machinery to cause cancer for more than a decade. Read more

Could Statins be Used to Fight a Deadly Viral Infection?

By Karen Kreeger | February 6, 2014 | Comments Hanta entry path Hannah Barbian

Two Perelman School of Medicine microbiologists may have found a way to use statins, the well-known blockbuster cholesterol-lowering drugs, to fight the hantavirus, a mysterious and lethal microorganism that appeared suddenly in the US southwest over 20 years ago Read more

Obscure Neurologic Diseases Discovered at Penn to be Focus of New Center

By Kim Menard | January 29, 2014 | Comments

The Penn team that discovered a series of related conditions involving autoimmune responses impairing neurological function is taking the program one step further by opening the Penn Center for Autoimmune Neurology. Read more

Renaissance Biochemist

By Karen Kreeger | November 15, 2013 | Comments Dutton head shot sketch Nov 13

Les Dutton, Ph.D., will be awarded the 2013 John Scott Award next week. He will be honored with a medal, certificate, and $12,000 for his "work on the elementary processes of oxidation-reduction and the diverse biological events coupled to it." Dutton is the Eldridge Reeves Johnson Professor of Biochemistry and Biophysics, the director of the Johnson Foundation for Molecular Biophysics, a Fellow of the Royal Society, and former chair of the Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania. And an accomplished artist, but more on that later. Read more

Finding Antitumor T cells in a Patient’s Own Cancer for Personalized Therapy

By Karen Kreeger | November 12, 2013 | Comments Powell Clinical Cancer Research schematic Nov 13

Patients with tumors that contain increased numbers of T lymphocytes generally survive longer than those with tumors without T-cell involvement, suggesting that T cells with potent antitumor function naturally exist in cancer and control tumor progression. With the exception of melanoma, it has been difficult to identify and isolate the tumor-reactive T cells from common cancers, however, the ability to do so could be used to fight a patient’s own cancer. Read more

Cancer Hitchhikers

By Karen Kreeger | October 7, 2013 | Comments Simon Cancer Discovery image cancer hitchhiker no label Oct 13 take 2

With this zoomed-in view, the Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute (AFCRI) lab of Celeste Simon, PhD, and postdoctoral fellow, T.S. Karin Eisinger-Mathason PhD, report in Cancer Discovery about the potential of the collagen-modifying enzyme PLOD2 as a new therapeutic target for the treatment of metastatic undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma. Read more

Hanging Cancer on the Fulcrum of the Acidic Hinge

By Karen Kreeger | September 17, 2013 | Comments Roth Cell Reports Acidic Hinge blog post image genomic instability Sept 13

Converging lines of evidence just go to show that there are many types of cancer associated with chromosomal translocations, and likely more to be found. Read more

The Med Days of Summer

By Karen Kreeger | August 22, 2013 | Comments PARS 1

On the Penn Med campus, mid-August marks the start of the end for many undergrads and high-school students who are wrapping up lab experiments and making presentations about their work in an array of programs designed to showcase what research is all about. Read more

Cycling for Cancer and Zebrafish

By Karen Kreeger | July 25, 2013 | Comments Dutko after race Blog image July 13

James Dutko, PhD, a postdoctoral researcher at the Perelman School of Medicine in the Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, spent a hot Sunday morning earlier this month cycling in the 41st annual Philadelphia Bike-a-Thon, an annual fundraising event for the American Cancer Society. Read more

Celebrating the Work of Medical Laboratory Professionals

By Karen Kreeger | April 30, 2013 | Comments Lab Week 2013 Poster Winner

To show its gratitude to all laboratory professionals, the department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine celebrated Medical Laboratory Professionals Week April 22-26, with a host of activities, such as Phillies Night, in appreciation of all the hard work and dedication of the hundreds of staff and faculty members working in more than 30 different laboratories across the Penn campus. Read more

Center for Brain Injury and Repair Presence at Philadelphia Science Festival Reaches Science Enthusiasts of all Ages

By Karen Kreeger | April 22, 2013 | Comments PSF 2013 Carnival Brain Tent 1 cropped

This year the Center for Brain Injury and Repair is reaching audiences of all stripes at the Philadelphia Science Festival, with their message of how to mind your brain from concussions with hand-on demos. Read more

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