Penn Medicine News Blog Archive: Surgery

Behind the Scenes of Bloodless Medicine and Surgery

By Olivia Fermano | June 6, 2014 | Comments image from http://s3.amazonaws.com/hires.aviary.com/k/mr6i2hifk4wxt1dp/14061315/2bb9628c-3f65-492d-b9dc-760f8f20f857.png

Annual spring symposium reenacts bloodless patient visit In May, the Center for Bloodless Medicine & Surgery (CBMS) at Pennsylvania Hospital welcomed over 100 guests to their annual spring symposium for a behind the scenes look at what it’s like to be and treat a bloodless patient. Yes, bloodless. The term... Read more

Breast Reduction Not a Magic Fix for Weight Loss

By Kim Menard | May 27, 2014 | Comments image from http://s3.amazonaws.com/hires.aviary.com/k/mr6i2hifk4wxt1dp/14052714/df4d02f0-1887-4092-9ae7-c7beaf8da7af.png

A new trend has started emerging in an unlikely area: Penn Plastic Surgeons have encountered an influx of women looking for a breast reduction surgery as a primary tool for weight loss. While there may be no magic solution to mastering the scales, experts suggest going back to the basics, and recommend that people dedicate time and energy to taking good care of themselves. Read more

PPMC's Take Your Child to Work Day 2014 — in photos!

By Robert Press | May 9, 2014 | Comments

Penn Presbyterian Medical Center (PPMC)’s annual Take Your Child to Work Day — wherein hundreds of children are led through various stations in the hospital, learning about the inner workings and interesting aspects of a daily job at the hospital — fell on April 24 this year, and featured stations... Read more

Another Wound Bites the Dust - All-Star Team Treats Chronic and Complex Wounds

By Kim Menard | March 7, 2014 | Comments

The new Penn Center for Wound Healing and Reconstruction – to treat people dealing with unrelenting wounds – aims to simplify the process by bringing a cadre of specialists together, centering around patient needs.

Master Clinicians, Then and Now

By John Shea | February 24, 2014 | Comments

Last year, all three of the University of Pennsylvania Health System’s hospitals were recognized by U.S. News & World Report as among the top 10 hospitals in Pennsylvania. To achieve that kind of recognition, it follows that Penn Medicine has plenty of highly skilled clinicians. A new program, supported by... Read more

Knee-Deep in the 2014 Winter Olympics

By Katie Delach | February 20, 2014 | Comments image from http://aviary.blob.core.windows.net/k-mr6i2hifk4wxt1dp-14022015/3eb96363-0391-445e-a105-6918f8618a92.png

Image courtesy of Alessando Trovati/AP For six days, the world has watched, waited, and celebrated as their countries’ preeminent athletes have competed for medals, records, and ultimately a place in history among Olympic greats. The 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi have unfolded with every bit of excitement and glory that... Read more

A Day in the Life at Penn Medicine

By Robert Press | December 16, 2013 | Comments

Each autumn, the University of Pennsylvania showcases its myriad activities — scholarly and otherwise — in a photo project called A Day in the Life. One day a year, from 12:00 a.m. to 11:59 p.m., everybody at UPenn is invited to submit photographs of what they're up to at any...

Behind the Scenes of the Robotic Prostate Cancer Surgery Chosen by Dr. Drew

By Greg Richter | October 10, 2013 | Comments IMG_4757

On his HLN show “Dr. Drew On Call,” Dr. Drew Pinsky, famous for sharing advice on sexual health, addiction, and other issues on his numerous TV shows, recently chronicled his journey with prostate cancer. Drew’s story began with a prostate specific antigen (PSA) test, a urine check, and an ultrasound... Read more

The Consequences of Beauty

By Kim Menard | October 9, 2013 | Comments

More and more people are seeking out medical procedures to improve their appearance - over 12 million facial cosmetic procedures are performed each year in the United States alone - but how does it impact their self confidence, or their quality of life?

Inside Look: Penn’s Bridge-to-Recovery Research May Help Heal Failing Hearts

By Jessica Mikulski | October 4, 2013 | Comments

An article in the Wall Street Journal this week highlights ongoing research at Penn Medicine looking at a new way to use ventricular assist devices (VADs) for heart failure patients. This same research was also featured in the article “Rest, Recovery, Reconditioning” in a recent edition of Penn Medicine’s System... Read more

A Look Back, in Photos: The Past Two Months or So Around Penn Medicine

By Robert Press | September 4, 2013 | Comments

Though my Penn Medicine ID card says 'Digital Communications Editor,' I've worn a few hats here — including in-house photographer. Because it's an aspect of the job that I love, I'd like to share some of the photos I've taken over the past month or so, giving readers a glimpse... Read more

High School Students from Around the World Attend Medical School Camp at Penn

By Steve Graff | August 1, 2013 | Comments IMG_3421

If you heard a bunch of high school students scream at the top of their lungs “Don’t kill the patient!” last week at the Penn Medicine Clinical Simulation Center at Rittenhouse, relax. Everyone is alive and well—it was just “Laparoscopic Olympics,” one of the many activities from the Perelman School... Read more

A Look Back, in Photos: The Past Two Months or So Around Penn Medicine

By Robert Press | July 16, 2013 | Comments

Though my Penn Medicine ID card says 'Digital Communications Editor,' I've worn a few hats here — including in-house photographer. Because it's an aspect of the job that I love, I'd like to share some of the photos I've taken over the past month or so, giving readers a glimpse... Read more

A Look Back, in Photos: The Past Month or So Around Penn Medicine

By Robert Press | May 23, 2013 | Comments IMG_1320

Though my Penn Medicine ID card says 'Digital Communications Editor,' I've worn a few hats here — including in-house photographer. Because it's an aspect of the job that I love, I'd like to share some of the photos I've taken over the past month or so, giving readers a glimpse... Read more

Robots to the Rescue: Penn Medicine Pioneers New Way to Treat Obstructive Sleep Apnea

By Jessica Mikulski | April 30, 2013 | Comments Dr. Thaler

Can sleeping actually make you MORE tired? For many patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), they awake each morning thinking they had a full night’s rest, only to feel exhausted and unfocused day after day. This counterintuitive situation occurs because OSA sufferers may wake up dozens of times an hour... Read more

“We Found a Change In Your DNA And We Don’t Know What it Means” – Questions and Challenges in the Era of Massively Parallel Gene Sequencing

By Holly Auer | April 15, 2013 | Comments Basser image

Women who develop breast cancer while they’re young are often searching for answers about the cause for their disease or what they can do to improve their chances of being cured. While an increasing number of large genetic testing panels promise to scrutinize their DNA to uncover clues, a team of researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine and the Abramson Cancer Center has found that those powerful tests tend to produce more questions than they answer. Read more

New Screening Offers More Prostate Cancer Treatment Options

By Greg Richter | April 15, 2013 | Comments Prostate-adenocarcinoma-from-wikimedia-commons

When news broke last July of the American Society for Clinical Oncology’s recommendation against PSA screening in many groups of men, Alan J. Wein, MD, professor and chief director, Division of Urology, shared his insight for the Penn Medicine News Blog. Wein noted that the test is worthwhile for some... Read more

Penn Medicine at the Forefront of the Quest to Cure Cancer

By Holly Auer | March 27, 2013 | Comments Time cover 2

Cover image via TIME.com This week’s TIME magazine makes an eye-catching, bold proclamation. HOW TO CURE CANCER, the cover reads, with a subhead previewing the story contained inside: “Yes, it’s now possible – thanks to new cancer dream teams that are delivering better results faster.” Much of that team science... Read more

Giving New Life to Dead Bones

By Katie Delach | December 14, 2012 | Comments IMG_0102

While most artificial hip joints in use today will last 10-20 years, like all devices, the artificial hip joint – which replaces the natural hip bone with a metal ball and resurfaces the hip socket with a metal shell and plastic liner – wears out over time. For younger patients, this means a second surgery (and maybe even a third) will be required to replace the artificial joint. Fortunately, a rare procedure now being offered by specialists at Penn Medicine provides a long-term alternative for younger patients with chronic hip pain. Read more

Unraveling Anesthesia’s Mystery

By Jessica Mikulski | December 10, 2012 | Comments Anesthesiologist_OR

Despite their use in approximately 60,000 surgeries per day in the U.S. alone, medical researchers don’t know exactly how anesthetics cause unconsciousness – or what the true long-term impact of their use could be on the brain and the rest of the body. "The development of anesthetic drugs has been... Read more

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