Penn Medicine News Blog Archive: Research

What We've Been Up To: January and February, in Pictures

By Robert Press | February 21, 2015 | Comments

If you feel like you've seen an awful lot of "Hey, check out some shots from the grand opening of [insert massive medical facility here]!" lately, that's because, well ... yeah, we've been opening a whole bunch of new space. In just the past few months we've celebrated the opening... Read more

Dreaming with a Healthy Heart

By Greg Richter | February 11, 2015 | Comments Collapsed-Airway-in-Sleep-Apnea-Patient

Throughout the month of February, affectionately known as American Heart Month, the News Blog highlights news and stories related to cardiovascular health from across Penn Medicine. Countless studies have proven that a lack of sleep is detrimental to your health in numerous ways, but how do sleep problems affect the... Read more

Focus on Rare Diseases is Common at Penn Medicine

By Karen Kreeger | February 6, 2015 | Comments Rare Disease Day Logo 2015

Penn Medicine has been at the forefront of rare disease research for decades, and these efforts – as well as many of its other research and clinical milestones -- are being honored this year as part of the Perelman School of Medicine’s 250th anniversary celebration. Read more

Beyond Cancer: When Both Parents Hold BRCA, a New Risk Can Emerge

By Karen Kreeger | January 14, 2015 | Comments Greenberg Cancer Discovery blog post image

Greenberg Cancer Discovery blog post imageMany families are acutely aware that BRCA1 and BRCA2 are the most important breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility genes. But recently a team including researchers at Penn Medicine discovered another risk it can pose in cancer patients when both parents carry the mutation. Read more

Year in Review: A Look Back at 2014!

By Steve Graff | December 31, 2014 | Comments

Before we ring in the New Year, the Penn Medicine department of Communications is taking a look back at 2014, a year filled with more breakthroughs in medical research, growth at the Penn Medicine campus, and philanthropic support. This year, we took a different approach and put together a year...

Using Collaboration and Innovation to Counteract Flat Federal Research Funding

By Karen Kreeger | December 18, 2014 | Comments Light bulb by shuttermonkey via Flickr

With such astounding shortfalls in funding for biomedical research, Penn Medicine, a key stakeholder of the new Penn Center for Innovation (PCI), is looking for fresh ways to fund research and partner with the private sector. The PCI consolidates and unifies the enterprise previously known as the Penn Center for Technology Transfer with other campus entities charged with commercializing Penn research and Development into license agreements, sponsored research agreements, startup companies and other collaborative relationships. Read more

Cell-adelphia?

By Karen Kreeger | December 4, 2014 | Comments ASCB Larger Than Life Gallery hall between Terminals E-F installation view

A preview of Penn Medicine cell biologists’ activities -- from art to advocacy to abstracts -- at the 2014 American Society for Cell Biology Annual Meeting in Philadelphia this week. Read more

Geroscience? Much More Than a Reaction to the “Silver Tsunami”

By Karen Kreeger | November 25, 2014 | Comments Geroscience The Seven Pillars of Aging

Geroscience is essentially an interdisciplinary field at the crossroads of aging and age-related diseases. Read more

Celebrating Women in Science

By Karen Kreeger | November 20, 2014 | Comments Women in science pic larger

Recently, the New York Times published the provocative op-ed, “Academic Science Isn’t Sexist,” which described a soon-to-be-published study that found that experiences of young and midcareer women in math-intensive fields are, for the most part, similar to those of their male counterparts in terms of hiring, pay, tenure and promotion,... Read more

Roundabout RNA: How Circular RNAs Form

By Karen Kreeger | October 24, 2014 | Comments Wilusz Genes Dev blog post pic from Science. jpg

Penn scientists are at the forefront of exploring and pushing back the boundaries of the bewilderingly complex world of RNA.And, Jeremy Wilusz, PhD, a new faculty member in the department of Biochemistry & Biophysics, is adding to that knowledge with a recently published paper in Genes & Development on circular RNAs. Read more

Forget Me Not

By Greg Richter | October 14, 2014 | Comments DSC_9129

Alzheimer’s disease is the sixth leading cause of death in the United States and the fourth leading cause of death among African Americans. Once patients have the disease, there is no treatment available that can stop its progression. The Penn Memory Center seeks to change that. Last month, the Penn... Read more

The Future of Telemedicine is Here

By Katie Delach | October 9, 2014 | Comments image from http://s3.amazonaws.com/hires.aviary.com/k/mr6i2hifk4wxt1dp/14101416/dea91fca-1943-42dc-a0fe-b26e31c313e0.png

Over the past 20 years, advancements in research and the understanding of genetics have created a boom in patient demand for genetic tests. According to the National Library of Medicine, less than 300 genetic tests were available in the 1990s; in contrast, at the end of 2012, almost 3,000 genetic... Read more

How a Fish-Killing Natural Product Opens Doors to the Basics of Cell Metabolism

By Karen Kreeger | October 1, 2014 | Comments Blair Rotenone pic Oct 14

Rotenone exposure is also associated with Parkinson’s disease (PD) in humans, but the exact mechanism is unknown. In fact, rotenone is used to induce a rodent model of PD. Mitochondrial abnormalities have been well documented in PD patients, often coinciding with elevated markers of oxidative stress. Despite this evidence, not much is known about how nerve cells die because of the stress. Read more

Whole Genome Sequencing of Amish Families Reveals Complexity of Bipolar Disorder

By Karen Kreeger | September 16, 2014 | Comments Lonestar

Perelman School genetics professor Maja Bucan, PhD, told me of her deep appreciation for the work going on at the clinic: “From my first visit to the clinic [Clinic for Special Children], I knew I wanted to be part of their team as a collaborator.” Read more

Liver Regeneration Revealed: Hepatocytes Beget Hepatocytes

By Karen Kreeger | September 11, 2014 | Comments Prometheus Karl-Ludwig Poggemann Flickr

The regenerating liver is center stage in a modern story about how science similarly reinvents and readjusts itself, with a paper out in an early September issue of Cell Stem Cell from the lab of Ben Stanger. Read more

Double Trouble: How Parasitic Worms Weaken Antiviral Immunity

By Karen Kreeger | September 5, 2014 | Comments Artis CM cover warhol worms Sept 14

David Artis, PhD, professor of Microbiology and his team, including first author Lisa Osborne, PhD, demonstrated that mice already infected with parasitic helminths were worse at fighting viral infection. Read more

Making the Summer Count

By Karen Kreeger | August 15, 2014 | Comments SUIP_Poster Session_1

Every summer, the news is filled with profiles of summer student programs, and those that are aimed at increased participation by minority students in STEM are no exception. The Summer Undergraduate Internship Program at Penn Medicine is one such program. Read more

Robots – Hi-Tech Help or Freaky Fiction?

By Olivia Fermano | August 10, 2014 | Comments image from http://s3.amazonaws.com/hires.aviary.com/k/mr6i2hifk4wxt1dp/14080820/612efab5-13b5-4786-b3a5-4e61fcc0285e.png

Robots cause a polarizing effect in the minds of people. We only have to look to Hollywood to illustrate this. They’re either portrayed as endearing characters like Star Wars’ C-3PO and R2D2 and the adorably-animated WALL-E – or they’re killing machines as seen in Terminator and iRobot. The fact is... Read more

Psoriasis: The Heart and Skin Connection

By Katie Delach | August 6, 2014 | Comments image from http://s3.amazonaws.com/hires.aviary.com/k/mr6i2hifk4wxt1dp/14080613/3ab5cafc-77b2-4bc5-9216-5340ce17a3b6.png

Did you know that psoriasis is more than merely a skin condition? It's a chronic inflammatory disease that increases a patient’s risk for other systemic disorders, such as atherosclerosis and renal damage. In the last year alone, researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have... Read more

A Picture Really is Worth 1000 Words

By Karen Kreeger | August 1, 2014 | Comments Talamas winning image 2014

The winners of the Penn Medicine 2014 “Art in Science" can certainly make pretty pictures with fancy microscopes, but there is also a rich story of scientific inquiry behind each. Read more

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