Penn Medicine News Blog Archive: Research

A Picture Really is Worth 1000 Words

By Karen Kreeger | August 1, 2014 | Comments Talamas winning image 2014

The winners of the Penn Medicine 2014 “Art in Science" can certainly make pretty pictures with fancy microscopes, but there is also a rich story of scientific inquiry behind each. Read more

The Force from Outside In: Cells Sense Surrounding Protein Stiffness for Insider Info

By Karen Kreeger | July 11, 2014 | Comments Assoian Bae blog post image final July 14

A new study is shedding light on how cells respond to surrounding “stiff” tissue that can influence cells to go rogue—and ultimately cause disease. A better understanding of that process could help advance the development of treatments for cancers and cardiovascular disease resistant to therapy. An article in Science Signaling... Read more

Exploring the Human Microbiome

By John Shea | July 2, 2014 | Comments PENN-Med_SPRING_2014_F3b_LR-1

Like many people, I have gone through life without paying much attention to my gut –- except, that is, for the times my stomach gave unmistakable indications that it was upset. Most of the time, what was happening inside said stomach remained unknown. On the whole, it was out of... Read more

What’s the Real Target for Attacking Pancreatic Tumors?

By Karen Kreeger | June 11, 2014 | Comments Pancreatic cancer ribbon

The lab of Ben Stanger, MD, PhD, assistant professor of Medicine in the Division of Gastroenterology, and colleagues, recently showed in a Cancer Cell study that some tumor components, particularly fibroblasts, constrain tumor growth. Read more

Cycling for Rare Diseases

By Karen Kreeger | May 1, 2014 | Comments image from http://s3.amazonaws.com/hires.aviary.com/k/mr6i2hifk4wxt1dp/14061615/ea083ced-d221-4295-800d-0e745dcaf7ba.png

The first annual Million Dollar Bike Ride is finally here. On Saturday, May 3, 2014, close to 500 riders and many other volunteers and family members will gather at Highline Park on Penn’s campus to raise funds for and awareness about rare diseases. Read more

Sleep the Night Away with Penn Med Scientists at the Philadelphia Science Festival

By Karen Kreeger | April 29, 2014 | Comments PSF sleep blog post image

Sleep -- elusive to some, mysterious to all -- is the topic of a special event at Franklin Institute’s Fels Planetarium on Wednesday, April 30, at 6:30 p.m. called Sleep: A Bedtime Story, part of the signature programs on the 2014 Philadelphia Science Festival schedule.

An Outdoor Kickoff to the Philadelphia Science Festival

By Karen Kreeger | April 23, 2014 | Comments Sci Fest logo outside

Head outdoors this weekend with Penn Medicine to kick off the fourth annual Philadelphia Science Festival.The weather for Saturday and Sunday is predicted to be 0% showers, with highs in the upper 60s and low 70s. Join Penn Medicine faculty, students, and staff at two of the city’s most spectacular...

Using the Penn High Performance Computing Cluster to Unravel the Spider’s Web

By Karen Kreeger | April 15, 2014 | Comments Golden Silk Orb Weaver L Church Flickr Creative Commons

Uncovering the genomic architecture of spider silk genes wasn’t top of mind for Benjamin Voight, PhD, when he first came to Penn a few years ago. But he and postdoctoral researcher Paul Babb are now deep into sequencing the whole genomes of two spider species: a Golden Silk Orb Weaver and Darwin's Bark Spider. Read more

No Magic Number - Penn Medicine Researcher to Be Among Architects of New National Sleep Recommendations

By Jessica Mikulski | April 8, 2014 | Comments image from http://s3.amazonaws.com/hires.aviary.com/k/mr6i2hifk4wxt1dp/14040813/5d9df654-4164-420e-8d13-d2ec60b7aabb.png

We’ve all heard it before…“sleep experts recommend you get 7 – 8 hours of sleep per night for optimal health.” But is that true for everyone? The answer is there really is no magic number. “For years, members of the sleep research and clinical community have been discussing the issue... Read more

2014 Facts and Figures Shows Penn Medicine’s Expanding Footprint

By Greg Richter | March 28, 2014 | Comments Facts-cover-2014

In the 2014 edition of Penn Medicine’s annual Facts and Figures report, readers can find numerous achievements in research, education, and patient care from the past year. Highlights from this year’s text include Penn Medicine continuing as one of the nation’s top recipients of National Institutes of Health funding, the... Read more

Oxygen in our Bones

By Karen Kreeger | March 20, 2014 | Comments Vinogradov Nature image

Working with many colleagues, a Penn team published in Nature the first application of 2PLM to directly quantify the physiological environment of blood stem cells, called haematopoietic stem cells, or HSCs. Read more

Beyond the Ivory Tower: Penn’s Neuroscience Grad Students Reach Out During Brain Week, and Beyond

By Karen Kreeger | March 18, 2014 | Comments NGG KidsJudge 2013 Synpatic Land

Philadelphia is a cerebral city this spring. To start, every March, Brain Awareness Week brings together institutions worldwide to celebrate the brain. Read more

OncoLink Celebrates 20 Years!

By Steve Graff | March 14, 2014 | Comments Oncolink-108

Creator Joel Goldwein, MD, Honored with “Visionary Award” at Anniversary Event Before there was Yahoo or Google, there was OncoLink—one of the first web sites to provide to cancer information, or really any information, on the internet. And it started right here at Penn Medicine. Today, 20 years later, it’s... Read more

New Art Installation Illustrates DNA Repair and Celebrates Hope for Patients and Families Carrying BRCA Mutations

By Katie Delach | March 13, 2014 | Comments image from http://aviary.blob.core.windows.net/k-mr6i2hifk4wxt1dp-14031319/5098170c-9d55-401c-a571-bb9bc6ebc5c8.png

Penn Medicine's Basser Research Center for BRCA Unveils Homologous Hope Sculpture On Wednesday, the University of Pennsylvania’s Basser Research Center for BRCA hosted a special event to formally unveil “Homologous Hope,” a new sculpture suspended from the glass atrium in the Perelman Center for Advanced Medicine. The large-scale piece was... Read more

Transcription Factors Key to Using T Cells Against Cancer, Chronic Infection

By Karen Kreeger | March 6, 2014 | Comments Wherry BATF spiral blog post Mar 14

Business is brisk in the lab of John Wherry and his team from the Department of Microbiology and the Institute for Immunology for papers on killer and helper T cells. Two studies -- bound by their focus on transcription factors important in the immune response – have come out of the lab in the last few weeks. And, they both identify potential new targets for cancer immunotherapies. Read more

Where Do We Go From Here? Public Health and Unconventional Natural Gas Drilling

By Karen Kreeger | February 25, 2014 | Comments CEET Symposium flyer Feb 14

Last week the Center of Excellence in Environmental Toxicology (CEET) and the Center for Public Health Initiatives at the University of Pennsylvania co-hosted a symposium on the public health effects of natural gas drilling operations Read more

Celebrating a Lifetime of Dual Career Success

By Karen Kreeger | February 20, 2014 | Comments Armstrongs Clay Clara

The five decades of research of Clara Franzini-Armstrong and Clay Armstrong, hers on electron microscopy of the inner workings of cells and his on ion channels in cell membranes, was recognized recently by their professional society -- the Society of General Physiologists – with a named lecture series. Read more

Art Beat: Penn Medicine Researchers Launch Nationwide Contest to Spotlight Lifesaving AEDs

By Jessica Mikulski | February 10, 2014 | Comments image from http://aviary.blob.core.windows.net/k-mr6i2hifk4wxt1dp-14021020/7d401b28-71c6-4e72-a07d-303a91e2d37b.png

The inaugural design in Amtrak's 30th Street Station in Philadelphia. To celebrate February as American Heart Month, the News Blog is highlighting some of the latest heart-centric news and stories from all areas of Penn Medicine. It’s a lifesaving device that you might walk by every day and not even... Read more

Could Statins be Used to Fight a Deadly Viral Infection?

By Karen Kreeger | February 6, 2014 | Comments Hanta entry path Hannah Barbian

Two Perelman School of Medicine microbiologists may have found a way to use statins, the well-known blockbuster cholesterol-lowering drugs, to fight the hantavirus, a mysterious and lethal microorganism that appeared suddenly in the US southwest over 20 years ago Read more

Memory May Fade with Dementia, but Artistic Abilities and Benefits Carry On

By Kim Menard | January 15, 2014 | Comments image from http://aviary.blob.core.windows.net/k-mr6i2hifk4wxt1dp-14012016/3cf16bf8-7ddb-4dfa-857b-ca584c507608.png

Since it is possible for Alzheimer's patients to create art, researchers are investigating whether art therapy improves symptoms or quality of life. A new review of studies assessing art interventions from Perelman School of Medicine researchers found that art creation and appreciation activities may improve Alzheimer's disease patients' mood, activities of daily living, quality of life, and even caregiver distress. Read more

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