Penn Medicine News Blog Archive: In the News

Icing on the Cake: Nation's Oldest Medical School Kicks Off Its 250th Birthday Year

By Steve Graff | September 9, 2014 | Comments

The Perelman School of Medicine kicked off its 250th birthday year with a cake-cutting celebration hosted by University of Pennsylvania President Amy Gutmann, PhD, and J. Larry Jameson, MD, PhD, Dean of the Perelman School of Medicine and Executive Vice President, University of Pennsylvania for the Health System, along with... Read more

Penn Medicine News: Now in Video Form!

By Robert Press | August 11, 2014 | Comments

One of the things I love most about technology — and specifically, the Internet — is that it has made the dissemination of information easier than ever before. I’m typing this on a laptop that is only slightly larger than a textbook but could, in no time at all, download... Read more

Penn Dermatology Efforts Help Push Tanning Bed Legislation Through

By Kim Menard | June 2, 2014 | Comments image from http://s3.amazonaws.com/hires.aviary.com/k/mr6i2hifk4wxt1dp/14053020/9ed5f88c-7012-4ab8-beb1-1e21342f9f45.png

Tanning in all forms is dangerous. A concerted effort by a cadre of Penn Medicine dermatologists has helped push legislation forward to prevent skin cancers by restricting access to tanning beds, one of the major drivers of the increased incidence of skin cancer in the United States. Current estimates are that one in five Americans will develop skin cancer in their lifetime.

Snoozing in Sochi: Penn Expert Discusses Why Athletes Need Sleep for Medal-Winning Performances

By Jessica Mikulski | February 21, 2014 | Comments image from http://aviary.blob.core.windows.net/k-mr6i2hifk4wxt1dp-14021821/f079cfce-d295-48d2-bcc6-52ee2ea7a9a4.png

We all know that getting a good night’s sleep can really make a big difference the next day. You wake up feeling refreshed and energized. Your mind is clear and you can take on the day. And that’s just for the average Joe. Sleep can also make a critical impact... Read more

Art Beat: Penn Medicine Researchers Launch Nationwide Contest to Spotlight Lifesaving AEDs

By Jessica Mikulski | February 10, 2014 | Comments image from http://aviary.blob.core.windows.net/k-mr6i2hifk4wxt1dp-14021020/7d401b28-71c6-4e72-a07d-303a91e2d37b.png

The inaugural design in Amtrak's 30th Street Station in Philadelphia. To celebrate February as American Heart Month, the News Blog is highlighting some of the latest heart-centric news and stories from all areas of Penn Medicine. It’s a lifesaving device that you might walk by every day and not even... Read more

Penn Medicine In the News: Philly vs. the Polar Vortex

By Robert Press | January 8, 2014 | Comments

It has been difficult to avoid the term polar vortex this week, as an aberration in Arctic winds led to much of the country experiencing dangerously low temperatures. Though Philadelphia escaped the worst this phenomena had to offer, temperatures in the city still dropped to their lowest point in several... Read more

Inside Look: Penn’s Bridge-to-Recovery Research May Help Heal Failing Hearts

By Jessica Mikulski | October 4, 2013 | Comments

An article in the Wall Street Journal this week highlights ongoing research at Penn Medicine looking at a new way to use ventricular assist devices (VADs) for heart failure patients. This same research was also featured in the article “Rest, Recovery, Reconditioning” in a recent edition of Penn Medicine’s System... Read more

Every Story Counts

By Kim Menard | August 20, 2013 | Comments NBC Nightly News Melissa Livney Penn Memory Center

Ever wonder what it's like to work in a media relations office at a busy academic medical center? Much like other aspects of medicine, it’s fast-paced – and there’s something new and often unexpected to work on every day. To give you a glimpse of the velocity and variety of topics we cover in a given year, we're pulling out some interesting stats from our 2013 fiscal year end media wrap-up report to share with you. Read more

Angelina Jolie’s Cancer Prevention Surgery Puts Basser Research Center for BRCA In National Spotlight

By Holly Auer | May 15, 2013 | Comments Basser.graphic.blue.background.expanded

Basser.graphic.blue.background.expanded This week, when Oscar-winning actress and humanitarian Angelina Jolie revealed that she underwent surgery to remove her breasts after learning that she carries one of the BRCA gene mutations that put her at high risk of developing breast and ovarian cancer, the news hit home here at the University of Pennsylvania. Just a year ago, Penn announced the creation of the Basser Research Center for BRCA, which was made possible by a $25 million gift from Penn alums Mindy and Jon Gray, in honor of Mindy Gray’s sister, Faith Basser, who died of ovarian cancer at age 44. As the only center in the United States devoted solely to research on prevention and treatment for cancers related to BRCA mutations, Jolie’s story turned a spotlight on the important work in progress there, and the experiences of the many other families with similar cancer risks. Read more

Penn Medicine at the Forefront of the Quest to Cure Cancer

By Holly Auer | March 27, 2013 | Comments Time cover 2

Cover image via TIME.com This week’s TIME magazine makes an eye-catching, bold proclamation. HOW TO CURE CANCER, the cover reads, with a subhead previewing the story contained inside: “Yes, it’s now possible – thanks to new cancer dream teams that are delivering better results faster.” Much of that team science... Read more

Are These the Medical Leaders of the Future?

By John Shea | March 12, 2013 | Comments

For an organization created in 1902, Alpha Omega Alpha is still going strong. That was certainly how it seemed last month when the Perelman School of Medicine inducted 31 members of the Class of 2013 –- and, in the special segment of the ceremony, one member of the faculty, Benoit... Read more

Heart Month Wrap Up: Hot Topics

By Jessica Mikulski | February 28, 2013 | Comments Jessup_AHA official photo

Mariell Jessup, MD To celebrate February as American Heart Month, the News Blog is highlighting some of the latest heart-centric news and stories from all areas of Penn Medicine. As we wrap-up our Heart Month blog post series, I asked Penn Medicine’s Mariell Jessup, MD, medical director of the Heart... Read more

Penn Medicine 2012 Year in Review

By Jessica Mikulski | December 31, 2012 | Comments Yearinreview

Taking a look back, 2012 has been a year marked by breakthroughs in medical research, system-wide growth, and landmark philanthropic support for Penn Medicine. As we set our sights on the year ahead, we also celebrate the past year's accomplishments and give thanks to the outstanding faculty, staff, and students...

Trauma and Recovery: Tips for Talking with Children about the Connecticut School Tragedy

By Jessica Mikulski | December 19, 2012 | Comments Steve_berkowitz2

Steve Berkowitz, MD, director of the Penn Center for Youth and Family Trauma Response and Recovery, outlines some strategies for helping children and teens process their feelings in the aftermath of the Sandy Hook Elementary school shooting. Read more

Deadly Choices: A Penn virologist takes on the anti-vaccine movement

By John Shea | October 1, 2012 | Comments

Exhibit A: This year’s incoming class of the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania was assigned to read Deadly Choices: How the Anti-Vaccine Movement Threatens Us All, by Paul A. Offit, MD. Issued by Basic Books in 2011, the book came out this year in paperback. During... Read more

Celebrating Every Moment

By Holly Auer | September 21, 2012 | Comments Chemo luau

Chemo luauBeach Boys music, hot dogs, sheet cake and feather boas aren’t the tools oncologists usually use to attack cancer. But along with powerful drugs and targeted radiation treatments, they’ve all played a big role in helping Debbie Hemmes, a 52-year-old Abramson Cancer Center patient from Westampton, NJ, fight lung cancer. Debbie’s daughter, Kelly McCollister, quickly added her own prescription to the list: a special party during each chemo session to help her mom count down the days until she finished her treatment. Read more

News Travels Fast: Penn Medicine News in Front of 30 Million People a Day

By Kim Menard | August 3, 2012 | Comments DSC00596

Now that Penn Medicine's new fiscal year, for 2013, is underway, we took a look back at our last year’s worth of media activities to see how our efforts to promote the research and clinical care work by our amazing faculty and staff made an impact from July 2011 through June 2012. Read more

Coping with the Colorado Shooting Tragedy: Penn Medicine Mental Health Experts Weigh In

By Jessica Mikulski | July 27, 2012 | Comments Police-tape

In the wake of the tragic shootings in Colorado last week, people across the country are still in shock as they try to contemplate the meaning behind such an evil act of human nature. Twelve people were killed and 59 more are struggling to recover from the injuries they sustained in the violent attack. And while many of them will make full physical recoveries, the memories of the shootings will persist. Penn Medicine mental health experts are now weighing in to help both the victims and the general public cope with the inevitable fear, anxiety and depression that can follow traumatic events like this. Read more

Connecting the Dots to an AIDS-Free Generation

By Holly Auer | July 25, 2012 | Comments Baligh_whitecoat_small

This week, HIV advocates, scientists, and patients gathered at the XIX International AIDS Conference in Washington, D.C. – the first time in 22 years the meeting was held in the United States. The group’s charge: mapping out a strategy to usher in an AIDS-free generation. Read more

Sepsis: Deceptive and Deadly

By Holly Auer | July 20, 2012 | Comments ER_HUP_2012

Sepsis researcher David Gaieski, MD, an assistant professor of Emergency Medicine in the Perelman School of Medicine and clinical director in Penn’s Center for Resuscitation Science, spoke this week with several news outlets about the issues raised by the case of the 12-year-old New York City boy who died of sepsis after his infection apparently went undetected at his doctor and an emergency room. ABCNews.com explored the reasons why these infections can be so difficult to identify when they’re easiest to treat: Read more

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