Penn Medicine News Blog Archive: Clinical Trials

Standing Up to Pancreatic Cancer is Tough—But Not Impossible

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Cancer Researchers and Celebrities Come Together for a Stand Up to Cancer Event to Announce New “Dream Team” “It can run, but it can’t hide.” That’s the message Robert Vonderheide, MD, DPhil, the Hanna Wise Professor in Cancer Research in the Abramson Cancer Center (ACC) and the Perelman School of...

“Technology and Pearls” – The Dichotomy of Women and Medicine throughout History

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In the 19th Century, rigorous work was thought to negatively affect female fertility. It was also thought to create a masculine and angular appearance in women, thus stunting the development of femininity. These are just a sample of some of the startling yet fascinating “facts” presented by ten distinguished speakers...

Oxygen in our Bones

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Working with many colleagues, a Penn team published in Nature the first application of 2PLM to directly quantify the physiological environment of blood stem cells, called haematopoietic stem cells, or HSCs.

A Rare-fied Friday at the End of Every February

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Rare Disease Day is an annual event to raise awareness with the general public and decision-makers about rare diseases and their impact on patients’ lives.

The “Other”Circulatory System

Kahn JCI image graphic Jan 14
Blood is the life force of animals. But behind the more well-known system of veins, arteries, and capillaries functions the mop-up crew, the vascular network called the lymph system.

Penn Medicine Year in Review 2013

With 2014 just around the corner, the Penn Medicine Department of Communications is taking a look back at the many highlights and achievements of our faculty, staff, and students in 2013. From landmark breakthroughs in medical research to system-wide growth, moving forward with new leadership to celebrating milestone accomplishments in...

Finding Antitumor T cells in a Patient’s Own Cancer for Personalized Therapy

Powell Clinical Cancer Research schematic Nov 13
Patients with tumors that contain increased numbers of T lymphocytes generally survive longer than those with tumors without T-cell involvement, suggesting that T cells with potent antitumor function naturally exist in cancer and control tumor progression. With the exception of melanoma, it has been difficult to identify and isolate the tumor-reactive T cells from common cancers, however, the ability to do so could be used to fight a patient’s own cancer.

Inside Look: Penn’s Bridge-to-Recovery Research May Help Heal Failing Hearts

An article in the Wall Street Journal this week highlights ongoing research at Penn Medicine looking at a new way to use ventricular assist devices (VADs) for heart failure patients. This same research was also featured in the article “Rest, Recovery, Reconditioning” in a recent edition of Penn Medicine’s System...

Angelina Jolie’s Cancer Prevention Surgery Puts Basser Research Center for BRCA In National Spotlight

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Basser.graphic.blue.background.expanded This week, when Oscar-winning actress and humanitarian Angelina Jolie revealed that she underwent surgery to remove her breasts after learning that she carries one of the BRCA gene mutations that put her at high risk of developing breast and ovarian cancer, the news hit home here at the University of Pennsylvania. Just a year ago, Penn announced the creation of the Basser Research Center for BRCA, which was made possible by a $25 million gift from Penn alums Mindy and Jon Gray, in honor of Mindy Gray’s sister, Faith Basser, who died of ovarian cancer at age 44. As the only center in the United States devoted solely to research on prevention and treatment for cancers related to BRCA mutations, Jolie’s story turned a spotlight on the important work in progress there, and the experiences of the many other families with similar cancer risks.

Celebrating the Work of Medical Laboratory Professionals

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To show its gratitude to all laboratory professionals, the department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine celebrated Medical Laboratory Professionals Week April 22-26, with a host of activities, such as Phillies Night, in appreciation of all the hard work and dedication of the hundreds of staff and faculty members working in more than 30 different laboratories across the Penn campus.

“We Found a Change In Your DNA And We Don’t Know What it Means” – Questions and Challenges in the Era of Massively Parallel Gene Sequencing

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Women who develop breast cancer while they’re young are often searching for answers about the cause for their disease or what they can do to improve their chances of being cured. While an increasing number of large genetic testing panels promise to scrutinize their DNA to uncover clues, a team of researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine and the Abramson Cancer Center has found that those powerful tests tend to produce more questions than they answer.

Penn Medicine at the Forefront of the Quest to Cure Cancer

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Cover image via TIME.com This week’s TIME magazine makes an eye-catching, bold proclamation. HOW TO CURE CANCER, the cover reads, with a subhead previewing the story contained inside: “Yes, it’s now possible – thanks to new cancer dream teams that are delivering better results faster.” Much of that team science...

Penn Medicine Researchers Take a Closer Look at Sleep and Heart Health

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When most people think about ways to improve their heart health, they consider eating a healthier diet, getting some additional exercise, and possibly sipping a glass of red wine each night. But few people really consider the complex role that sleep – yes, sleep – plays in their overall cardiovascular...

New Hope on the Horizon: Penn Tests Non-Invasive, Medication-free Treatment for Major Depression

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Depression is one of the most common types of mental illness. Estimated to affect over 17 million people in the United States, it can afflict anyone at any time. Patients commonly report feelings of sadness, fear, hopelessness, and worthlessness, even if everything else in their lives seems to be going...

Heart Research Hits Close to Home for a New Penn Med Prof

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 To celebrate February as American Heart Month, the News Blog is highlighting some of the latest heart-centric news and stories from all areas of Penn Medicine. “I know this sounds like a cliché, but one of the main reasons I’m interested in learning about the genetic basis of heart...

New Procedure Aims to Lower Treatment-resistant Hypertension

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Penn Medicine is the first in the region to begin testing a new procedure to help people whose high blood pressure can't be controlled using currently available medications.

The Many Faces of Metformin

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Metformin, the most widely prescribed diabetes drug, has come full circle from a home remedy in the European medieval apothecary called goat’s rue to now being investigated for a host of modern chronic conditions.

Penn Medicine 2012 Year in Review

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Taking a look back, 2012 has been a year marked by breakthroughs in medical research, system-wide growth, and landmark philanthropic support for Penn Medicine. As we set our sights on the year ahead, we also celebrate the past year's accomplishments and give thanks to the outstanding faculty, staff, and students...

Preserving Fertility in the Face of Cancer

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At any one time, Penn Medicine investigators run as many as 3,000 studies involving human subjects, generating knowledge about disease and finding new cures. And making sure these studies run smoothly are 700 clinical research coordinators who do everything from recruiting patients and administering medication to collecting the data that...

In the Pink Shadow: Pancreatic Cancer Awareness Month Needs the Spotlight Now

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With each passing year the month of November loses more and more respect. On paper it looks good – All Saint’s, All Soul’s, Veteran’s and Election Day come right in a row within the first two weeks. But poor Thanksgiving. For several centuries it rose through the ranks as one...

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