Penn Medicine News Blog Archive: Clinical Trials

A Mutation, a New Drug, and a New Life

By Steve Graff | July 10, 2015 | Comments IMG_2462_large

Lois Hahn couldn’t have been happier on Tuesday. The 71-year-old wife and grandmother was back at Penn’s Abramson Cancer Center, with her son and husband by her side, for a follow-up visit with her medical oncologist, Alexander Perl, MD, an assistant professor of Hematology/Oncology in the ACC. She’s feeling and... Read more

When Less is Just Right

By Olivia Fermano | June 23, 2015 | Comments Ford-labcoat

Philadelphia is chock full of historical firsts, including in the field of medicine. Just last month, two of Penn Medicine’s big “firsts” celebrated their birthdays: the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania – the nation’s first medical school – turned 250 and Pennsylvania Hospital, the nation’s first... Read more

A “Hardy Perennial” View of Conflict of Interest

By Karen Kreeger | June 12, 2015 | Comments Conflict of interest E Pluribus

Perennials and hope spring eternal. And so it seems does the debate over conflict of interest in academia. The latest deliberations took place last week in the pages of two of the world’s most prestigious medical journals. Three former New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) editors commented in a British... Read more

Buzz Around Immunotherapy Continues at ASCO

By Steve Graff | June 5, 2015 | Comments Twitter

I read a very witty and apt tweet at this week’s American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) annual meeting—the medical conference attended by over 30,000 oncologists and others in the field from all over the world: “Immunotherapy is like the hashtag—it’s here to stay.” The pithy 100 or so characters—replete... Read more

Making Medical Research Mobile

By Katie Delach | April 1, 2015 | Comments image from http://s3.amazonaws.com/hires.aviary.com/k/mr6i2hifk4wxt1dp/15040113/56814248-cde0-44eb-bca0-1dcd63be708d.png

In the laundry list of things you can do with a few swipes or taps of your finger – create a grocery list, conduct banking transactions, and track your daily workout – researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine are partnering with software developers to help create mobile apps aimed... Read more

Year in Review: A Look Back at 2014!

By Steve Graff | December 31, 2014 | Comments

Before we ring in the New Year, the Penn Medicine department of Communications is taking a look back at 2014, a year filled with more breakthroughs in medical research, growth at the Penn Medicine campus, and philanthropic support. This year, we took a different approach and put together a year...

Looking for Answers in the Genes of ‘Exceptional’ Cancer Patients

By Steve Graff | December 1, 2014 | Comments Bile duct cancer

The little-known metastatic bile duct cancer—or cholangiocarcinoma—is one of the toughest cancers out there to beat. It’s usually caught late and requires an aggressive round of chemotherapy and radiation that, in most cases, only stabilizes it briefly. It can come roaring back and often leads to death. But that wasn’t... Read more

The Future of Telemedicine is Here

By Katie Delach | October 9, 2014 | Comments image from http://s3.amazonaws.com/hires.aviary.com/k/mr6i2hifk4wxt1dp/14101416/dea91fca-1943-42dc-a0fe-b26e31c313e0.png

Over the past 20 years, advancements in research and the understanding of genetics have created a boom in patient demand for genetic tests. According to the National Library of Medicine, less than 300 genetic tests were available in the 1990s; in contrast, at the end of 2012, almost 3,000 genetic... Read more

Psoriasis: The Heart and Skin Connection

By Katie Delach | August 6, 2014 | Comments image from http://s3.amazonaws.com/hires.aviary.com/k/mr6i2hifk4wxt1dp/14080613/3ab5cafc-77b2-4bc5-9216-5340ce17a3b6.png

Did you know that psoriasis is more than merely a skin condition? It's a chronic inflammatory disease that increases a patient’s risk for other systemic disorders, such as atherosclerosis and renal damage. In the last year alone, researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have... Read more

Penn Medicine Remembers Victims of Malaysia Airlines Flight: A Loss to the HIV/AIDS Community

By Steve Graff | July 25, 2014 | Comments Ribbon

WHYY’s Radio Times’ show last Friday focused on much of the progress that’s been made in the world of HIV/AIDS research and care, but there was one terrible set back that had to be addressed. Earlier that morning, news broke that the Malaysia Airlines plane struck down over the Ukraine... Read more

Lab Week 2014

By Karen Kreeger | May 8, 2014 | Comments Lab Week 2014 Rock Your Pride logo

Late last month Penn Med observed Medical Laboratory Professionals Week, a time to celebrate the hard work and dedication of the 600-plus lab professionals in more than 30 laboratories across the health system.

Standing Up to Pancreatic Cancer is Tough—But Not Impossible

By Steve Graff | April 12, 2014 | Comments 483333001

Cancer Researchers and Celebrities Come Together for a Stand Up to Cancer Event to Announce New “Dream Team” “It can run, but it can’t hide.” That’s the message Robert Vonderheide, MD, DPhil, the Hanna Wise Professor in Cancer Research in the Abramson Cancer Center (ACC) and the Perelman School of... Read more

“Technology and Pearls” – The Dichotomy of Women and Medicine throughout History

By Olivia Fermano | April 7, 2014 | Comments HWHC_2014_2

In the 19th Century, rigorous work was thought to negatively affect female fertility. It was also thought to create a masculine and angular appearance in women, thus stunting the development of femininity. These are just a sample of some of the startling yet fascinating “facts” presented by ten distinguished speakers... Read more

Oxygen in our Bones

By Karen Kreeger | March 20, 2014 | Comments Vinogradov Nature image

Working with many colleagues, a Penn team published in Nature the first application of 2PLM to directly quantify the physiological environment of blood stem cells, called haematopoietic stem cells, or HSCs. Read more

A Rare-fied Friday at the End of Every February

By Karen Kreeger | February 27, 2014 | Comments image from http://aviary.blob.core.windows.net/k-mr6i2hifk4wxt1dp-14030517/8e9c0f27-2e6d-453a-9c54-f890d88b9907.png

Rare Disease Day is an annual event to raise awareness with the general public and decision-makers about rare diseases and their impact on patients’ lives. Read more

The “Other”Circulatory System

By Karen Kreeger | January 10, 2014 | Comments Kahn JCI image graphic Jan 14

Blood is the life force of animals. But behind the more well-known system of veins, arteries, and capillaries functions the mop-up crew, the vascular network called the lymph system. Read more

Penn Medicine Year in Review 2013

By Jessica Mikulski | December 30, 2013 | Comments

With 2014 just around the corner, the Penn Medicine Department of Communications is taking a look back at the many highlights and achievements of our faculty, staff, and students in 2013. From landmark breakthroughs in medical research to system-wide growth, moving forward with new leadership to celebrating milestone accomplishments in...

Finding Antitumor T cells in a Patient’s Own Cancer for Personalized Therapy

By Karen Kreeger | November 12, 2013 | Comments Powell Clinical Cancer Research schematic Nov 13

Patients with tumors that contain increased numbers of T lymphocytes generally survive longer than those with tumors without T-cell involvement, suggesting that T cells with potent antitumor function naturally exist in cancer and control tumor progression. With the exception of melanoma, it has been difficult to identify and isolate the tumor-reactive T cells from common cancers, however, the ability to do so could be used to fight a patient’s own cancer. Read more

Inside Look: Penn’s Bridge-to-Recovery Research May Help Heal Failing Hearts

By Jessica Mikulski | October 4, 2013 | Comments

An article in the Wall Street Journal this week highlights ongoing research at Penn Medicine looking at a new way to use ventricular assist devices (VADs) for heart failure patients. This same research was also featured in the article “Rest, Recovery, Reconditioning” in a recent edition of Penn Medicine’s System... Read more

Angelina Jolie’s Cancer Prevention Surgery Puts Basser Research Center for BRCA In National Spotlight

By Holly Auer | May 15, 2013 | Comments Basser.graphic.blue.background.expanded

Basser.graphic.blue.background.expanded This week, when Oscar-winning actress and humanitarian Angelina Jolie revealed that she underwent surgery to remove her breasts after learning that she carries one of the BRCA gene mutations that put her at high risk of developing breast and ovarian cancer, the news hit home here at the University of Pennsylvania. Just a year ago, Penn announced the creation of the Basser Research Center for BRCA, which was made possible by a $25 million gift from Penn alums Mindy and Jon Gray, in honor of Mindy Gray’s sister, Faith Basser, who died of ovarian cancer at age 44. As the only center in the United States devoted solely to research on prevention and treatment for cancers related to BRCA mutations, Jolie’s story turned a spotlight on the important work in progress there, and the experiences of the many other families with similar cancer risks. Read more

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