Penn Medicine News Blog Archive: Cancer

Beyond Skin Deep: How Scars Affect Psychosocial Well-Being

By Katie Delach | May 18, 2015 | Comments Laser-for-scars-face-body2

Americans spend more than $12 billion per year on cosmetic procedures to enhance their appearance, whether it’s tanning, implanting, nipping or tucking. That’s because physical appearance influences nearly every aspect of our lives. And it’s not all our own insecurities or judgments, either. Studies show that strangers who observe photographs... Read more

The New Avengers: Lab-Coated Heroes Honored for Behind-the-Scenes Contributions

By Karen Kreeger | May 5, 2015 | Comments Lab week 2015 logo

Late last month Penn Medicine observed the fortieth Medical Laboratory Professionals Week, a time to recognize the hard work and dedication of the 600-plus lab professionals in more than 30 laboratories across the health system. Read more

Roberts Proton Therapy Center Celebrates 5 Years (Photos)

By Steve Graff | April 23, 2015 | Comments 15

Congratulations to the Roberts Proton Therapy Center on its five year anniversary! On Wednesday night, the department of Radiation Oncology held an event in the Smilow Center for Translational Research to celebrate this significant milestone with faculty, staff, Penn Medicine leadership, patients and their families, and the Roberts family, including... Read more

Removing Barriers to Breast Cancer Care

By Olivia Fermano | February 13, 2015 | Comments image from http://s3.amazonaws.com/hires.aviary.com/k/mr6i2hifk4wxt1dp/15021321/9c9ef157-fe05-4d2c-85e5-28de26e2480c.png

I overheard a breast cancer patient once say: There is only one thing worse than having cancer – not being able to afford it. Sobering. Financial cost remains a barrier to cancer screenings - let alone cancer treatment - among lower income women. While multiple factors contribute to racial and... Read more

Focus on Rare Diseases is Common at Penn Medicine

By Karen Kreeger | February 6, 2015 | Comments Rare Disease Day Logo 2015

Penn Medicine has been at the forefront of rare disease research for decades, and these efforts – as well as many of its other research and clinical milestones -- are being honored this year as part of the Perelman School of Medicine’s 250th anniversary celebration. Read more

Beyond Cancer: When Both Parents Hold BRCA, a New Risk Can Emerge

By Karen Kreeger | January 14, 2015 | Comments Greenberg Cancer Discovery blog post image

Greenberg Cancer Discovery blog post imageMany families are acutely aware that BRCA1 and BRCA2 are the most important breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility genes. But recently a team including researchers at Penn Medicine discovered another risk it can pose in cancer patients when both parents carry the mutation. Read more

Year in Review: A Look Back at 2014!

By Steve Graff | December 31, 2014 | Comments

Before we ring in the New Year, the Penn Medicine department of Communications is taking a look back at 2014, a year filled with more breakthroughs in medical research, growth at the Penn Medicine campus, and philanthropic support. This year, we took a different approach and put together a year...

Using Collaboration and Innovation to Counteract Flat Federal Research Funding

By Karen Kreeger | December 18, 2014 | Comments Light bulb by shuttermonkey via Flickr

With such astounding shortfalls in funding for biomedical research, Penn Medicine, a key stakeholder of the new Penn Center for Innovation (PCI), is looking for fresh ways to fund research and partner with the private sector. The PCI consolidates and unifies the enterprise previously known as the Penn Center for Technology Transfer with other campus entities charged with commercializing Penn research and Development into license agreements, sponsored research agreements, startup companies and other collaborative relationships. Read more

Making Better Sense of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

By Steve Graff | December 10, 2014 | Comments AML-M1

Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is one of those cancers so genetically complex, with its many chromosomal abnormalities and mutations, that it has been hard for doctors to find clinically meaningful information to sort out this diversity. So when three gene sequencing studies from Penn Medicine show patterns that may help... Read more

Looking for Answers in the Genes of ‘Exceptional’ Cancer Patients

By Steve Graff | December 1, 2014 | Comments Bile duct cancer

The little-known metastatic bile duct cancer—or cholangiocarcinoma—is one of the toughest cancers out there to beat. It’s usually caught late and requires an aggressive round of chemotherapy and radiation that, in most cases, only stabilizes it briefly. It can come roaring back and often leads to death. But that wasn’t... Read more

Penn Medicine Day in the Life 2014

By Robert Press | November 12, 2014 | Comments

It’s fall, and with fall come a few annual traditions: the leaves changing color, pumpkin spice everything, Christmas decorations a full two months early, and — most relevant to us here at Penn Medicine — the Day in the Life project. It’s a yearly visual documentation of life here at... Read more

The Future of Telemedicine is Here

By Katie Delach | October 9, 2014 | Comments image from http://s3.amazonaws.com/hires.aviary.com/k/mr6i2hifk4wxt1dp/14101416/dea91fca-1943-42dc-a0fe-b26e31c313e0.png

Over the past 20 years, advancements in research and the understanding of genetics have created a boom in patient demand for genetic tests. According to the National Library of Medicine, less than 300 genetic tests were available in the 1990s; in contrast, at the end of 2012, almost 3,000 genetic... Read more

Detecting Lung Cancer Before It's Too Late

By Lee-Ann Donegan | October 3, 2014 | Comments image from http://s3.amazonaws.com/hires.aviary.com/k/mr6i2hifk4wxt1dp/14100317/5e5113a7-1b64-4023-b32e-78e3a593ddcd.png

Anil Vachani, MD, director of the Lung Nodule Program and assistant professor of Medicine at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and the Veteran's Administration Medical Center; Attending Physician, Philadelphia Veterans Administration Medical Center. Lung cancer is the deadliest of all cancers, and cigarette smoking causes 85 percent of... Read more

How a Fish-Killing Natural Product Opens Doors to the Basics of Cell Metabolism

By Karen Kreeger | October 1, 2014 | Comments Blair Rotenone pic Oct 14

Rotenone exposure is also associated with Parkinson’s disease (PD) in humans, but the exact mechanism is unknown. In fact, rotenone is used to induce a rodent model of PD. Mitochondrial abnormalities have been well documented in PD patients, often coinciding with elevated markers of oxidative stress. Despite this evidence, not much is known about how nerve cells die because of the stress. Read more

The Art of War Against Cancer

By Olivia Fermano | September 23, 2014 | Comments image from http://s3.amazonaws.com/hires.aviary.com/k/mr6i2hifk4wxt1dp/14092319/ef10d5fc-5142-4b70-86f3-a4ca15afedd4.png

The Art of War, the military treatise attributed to the ancient Chinese general Sun Tzu, has influenced more than warfare since it was written over 2,000 years ago. Its principles have been applied to not only military strategies and tactics, but political, economic and legal ones as well. Today, Tzu's... Read more

The Deafening Silence of Ovarian Cancer

By Katie Delach | September 10, 2014 | Comments image from http://s3.amazonaws.com/hires.aviary.com/k/mr6i2hifk4wxt1dp/14091020/af1fcd35-8dd8-4b4b-9f58-771cbbc5611c.png

It’s called a “silent killer” because it doesn’t announce its presence. There is no chest pain or difficulty breathing like there is with lung cancer. You won’t have mood swings or nausea like you might with brain cancer. The most noticeable early symptoms of ovarian cancer might be as simple... Read more

Two Diseases Can’t Keep ACC Patient off His Bike

By Steve Graff | September 8, 2014 | Comments Photo (2)

Abramson Cancer Center patient Marc Barag started training for the Ride to Conquer Cancer about two years ago—he just didn’t know it. Diagnosed with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and enduring 96-hour sessions of chemotherapy, Barag decided to jump on an exercise bike he spotted on the infusion center floor one day to... Read more

Cancer Patient Shows Us Radiation Therapy through a Different Lens

By Steve Graff | August 28, 2014 | Comments

Thomas Ashley, a seasoned Philadelphia filmmaker, has a message for anyone dealing with a cancer diagnosis and the prospect of undergoing radiation therapy: It's not as scary as it seems. He's telling his story in the form of a new video he produced that documents his own experience as a... Read more

Making the Summer Count

By Karen Kreeger | August 15, 2014 | Comments SUIP_Poster Session_1

Every summer, the news is filled with profiles of summer student programs, and those that are aimed at increased participation by minority students in STEM are no exception. The Summer Undergraduate Internship Program at Penn Medicine is one such program. Read more

"Break" from Cancer a Turning Point for Patient

By Sally Sapega | July 16, 2014 | Comments Daryl Robinson cropped

Merriam-Webster’s dictionary defines respite as “a short period of time when you are able to stop doing something that is difficult or unpleasant.” The trips that For Pete’s Sake Cancer Respite Foundation provide for patients clearly fit that definition. The all-expense-paid vacation is a chance for the patient –– and... Read more

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