Penn Medicine News Blog Archive: Cancer

The Future of Telemedicine is Here

By Katie Delach | October 9, 2014 | Comments image from http://s3.amazonaws.com/hires.aviary.com/k/mr6i2hifk4wxt1dp/14101416/dea91fca-1943-42dc-a0fe-b26e31c313e0.png

Over the past 20 years, advancements in research and the understanding of genetics have created a boom in patient demand for genetic tests. According to the National Library of Medicine, less than 300 genetic tests were available in the 1990s; in contrast, at the end of 2012, almost 3,000 genetic... Read more

Detecting Lung Cancer Before It's Too Late

By Lee-Ann Donegan | October 3, 2014 | Comments image from http://s3.amazonaws.com/hires.aviary.com/k/mr6i2hifk4wxt1dp/14100317/5e5113a7-1b64-4023-b32e-78e3a593ddcd.png

Anil Vachani, MD, director of the Lung Nodule Program and assistant professor of Medicine at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and the Veteran's Administration Medical Center; Attending Physician, Philadelphia Veterans Administration Medical Center. Lung cancer is the deadliest of all cancers, and cigarette smoking causes 85 percent of... Read more

How a Fish-Killing Natural Product Opens Doors to the Basics of Cell Metabolism

By Karen Kreeger | October 1, 2014 | Comments Blair Rotenone pic Oct 14

Rotenone exposure is also associated with Parkinson’s disease (PD) in humans, but the exact mechanism is unknown. In fact, rotenone is used to induce a rodent model of PD. Mitochondrial abnormalities have been well documented in PD patients, often coinciding with elevated markers of oxidative stress. Despite this evidence, not much is known about how nerve cells die because of the stress. Read more

The Art of War Against Cancer

By Olivia Fermano | September 23, 2014 | Comments image from http://s3.amazonaws.com/hires.aviary.com/k/mr6i2hifk4wxt1dp/14092319/ef10d5fc-5142-4b70-86f3-a4ca15afedd4.png

The Art of War, the military treatise attributed to the ancient Chinese general Sun Tzu, has influenced more than warfare since it was written over 2,000 years ago. Its principles have been applied to not only military strategies and tactics, but political, economic and legal ones as well. Today, Tzu's... Read more

The Deafening Silence of Ovarian Cancer

By Katie Delach | September 10, 2014 | Comments image from http://s3.amazonaws.com/hires.aviary.com/k/mr6i2hifk4wxt1dp/14091020/af1fcd35-8dd8-4b4b-9f58-771cbbc5611c.png

It’s called a “silent killer” because it doesn’t announce its presence. There is no chest pain or difficulty breathing like there is with lung cancer. You won’t have mood swings or nausea like you might with brain cancer. The most noticeable early symptoms of ovarian cancer might be as simple... Read more

Two Diseases Can’t Keep ACC Patient off His Bike

By Steve Graff | September 8, 2014 | Comments Photo (2)

Abramson Cancer Center patient Marc Barag started training for the Ride to Conquer Cancer about two years ago—he just didn’t know it. Diagnosed with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and enduring 96-hour sessions of chemotherapy, Barag decided to jump on an exercise bike he spotted on the infusion center floor one day to... Read more

Cancer Patient Shows Us Radiation Therapy through a Different Lens

By Steve Graff | August 28, 2014 | Comments

Thomas Ashley, a seasoned Philadelphia filmmaker, has a message for anyone dealing with a cancer diagnosis and the prospect of undergoing radiation therapy: It's not as scary as it seems. He's telling his story in the form of a new video he produced that documents his own experience as a... Read more

Making the Summer Count

By Karen Kreeger | August 15, 2014 | Comments SUIP_Poster Session_1

Every summer, the news is filled with profiles of summer student programs, and those that are aimed at increased participation by minority students in STEM are no exception. The Summer Undergraduate Internship Program at Penn Medicine is one such program. Read more

"Break" from Cancer a Turning Point for Patient

By Sally Sapega | July 16, 2014 | Comments Daryl Robinson cropped

Merriam-Webster’s dictionary defines respite as “a short period of time when you are able to stop doing something that is difficult or unpleasant.” The trips that For Pete’s Sake Cancer Respite Foundation provide for patients clearly fit that definition. The all-expense-paid vacation is a chance for the patient –– and... Read more

The Force from Outside In: Cells Sense Surrounding Protein Stiffness for Insider Info

By Karen Kreeger | July 11, 2014 | Comments Assoian Bae blog post image final July 14

A new study is shedding light on how cells respond to surrounding “stiff” tissue that can influence cells to go rogue—and ultimately cause disease. A better understanding of that process could help advance the development of treatments for cancers and cardiovascular disease resistant to therapy. An article in Science Signaling... Read more

Hope Rings Eternal for Patients at the Abramson Cancer Center Pennsylvania Hospital

By Olivia Fermano | June 26, 2014 | Comments 6 Schieft Hope Bell-pt

In 1733, the English poet Alexander Pope penned the famous line, “Hope springs eternal in the human breast,” in "An Essay on Man, Epistle I." Over three and a half centuries later, Pope’s words still resonate with profound meaning. No matter the circumstances, humankind continues to have the capacity to... Read more

Taking a Look "Inside Penn Medicine"

By Sally Sapega | June 16, 2014 | Comments IPM-publications-blog-photo-new

Penn Medicine is a vibrant community of students and health-care professionals. Get a glimpse into what’s happening in this world of education, clinical care and research through our internal newsletters, located on the “Inside Penn Medicine” homepage and in print editions throughout UPHS. You can also subscribe to get news... Read more

What’s the Real Target for Attacking Pancreatic Tumors?

By Karen Kreeger | June 11, 2014 | Comments Pancreatic cancer ribbon

The lab of Ben Stanger, MD, PhD, assistant professor of Medicine in the Division of Gastroenterology, and colleagues, recently showed in a Cancer Cell study that some tumor components, particularly fibroblasts, constrain tumor growth. Read more

Behind the Scenes of Bloodless Medicine and Surgery

By Olivia Fermano | June 6, 2014 | Comments image from http://s3.amazonaws.com/hires.aviary.com/k/mr6i2hifk4wxt1dp/14061315/2bb9628c-3f65-492d-b9dc-760f8f20f857.png

Annual spring symposium reenacts bloodless patient visit In May, the Center for Bloodless Medicine & Surgery (CBMS) at Pennsylvania Hospital welcomed over 100 guests to their annual spring symposium for a behind the scenes look at what it’s like to be and treat a bloodless patient. Yes, bloodless. The term... Read more

An Anniversary to Remember

By Greg Richter | May 12, 2014 | Comments Photo

Debbie and Jack McColgan’s love for one another was evident to many at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania (HUP) well before the couple’s 38th wedding anniversary last month. At HUP for more than 100 days, Jack battles large B cell non Hodgkin’s lymphoma, with radiation, chemotherapy, and other... Read more

Feeling Confident in Your Skin

By Kim Menard | April 28, 2014 | Comments image from http://s3.amazonaws.com/hires.aviary.com/k/mr6i2hifk4wxt1dp/14042720/b26a0024-45f2-4a2c-ab22-5947619daef0.png

As the temperature starts to rise and layers of clothing are starting to be shed, it's time for our annual reminder to think about our skin! This year, Penn Dermatology is offering not one, but two free programs to help everyone feel confident and comfortable in their skin. Free Radiation...

Standing Up to Pancreatic Cancer is Tough—But Not Impossible

By Steve Graff | April 12, 2014 | Comments 483333001

Cancer Researchers and Celebrities Come Together for a Stand Up to Cancer Event to Announce New “Dream Team” “It can run, but it can’t hide.” That’s the message Robert Vonderheide, MD, DPhil, the Hanna Wise Professor in Cancer Research in the Abramson Cancer Center (ACC) and the Perelman School of... Read more

“Technology and Pearls” – The Dichotomy of Women and Medicine throughout History

By Olivia Fermano | April 7, 2014 | Comments HWHC_2014_2

In the 19th Century, rigorous work was thought to negatively affect female fertility. It was also thought to create a masculine and angular appearance in women, thus stunting the development of femininity. These are just a sample of some of the startling yet fascinating “facts” presented by ten distinguished speakers... Read more

Twenty Years Later: How Breast Cancer Risk Genes are Changing Patient Care

By Katie Delach | April 1, 2014 | Comments image from http://hires.aviary.com/k/mr6i2hifk4wxt1dp/14040116/c3cea997-611f-46a2-b57c-3346cde4ae63.png

In the mid-1990s, scientists for the first time were able to isolate and clone the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, mutations in which were thought to increase susceptibility to early onset breast and ovarian cancers. A new Perspective published last week in Science takes a look back at the last twenty... Read more

Oxygen in our Bones

By Karen Kreeger | March 20, 2014 | Comments Vinogradov Nature image

Working with many colleagues, a Penn team published in Nature the first application of 2PLM to directly quantify the physiological environment of blood stem cells, called haematopoietic stem cells, or HSCs. Read more

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