Penn Medicine News Blog Archive: Brain and Behavior

The Trend: More than a Twitter Sidebar

By Robert Press | December 5, 2014 | Comments image from http://s3.amazonaws.com/hires.aviary.com/k/mr6i2hifk4wxt1dp/14120517/ef8774b6-3264-4137-8771-02f4522ceb1c.png

I've always found one of the most fascinating aspects of social media to be its Hemingway-like quest to pack as much information into as small a space as possible. What started with Xanga and LiveJournal — two of the many longform blogging platforms us angsty teenagers of the early 2000s... Read more

Geroscience? Much More Than a Reaction to the “Silver Tsunami”

By Karen Kreeger | November 25, 2014 | Comments Geroscience The Seven Pillars of Aging

Geroscience is essentially an interdisciplinary field at the crossroads of aging and age-related diseases. Read more

Using Neural Tissue Engineering to Restore Brain Function and Form Bionic Connections

By Lee-Ann Donegan | November 19, 2014 | Comments Cullen neuron.axon image November 2014

Restoring Brain Connections using Micro-Tissue Engineered Neural Networks (TENNs): Micro-TENNs are miniature preformed capsule-like constructs (shown above) that consist of neurons spanned by long axon tracts. These are grown outside the body and mimic the anatomy of axon pathways in the brain. They can then be implanted in the brain... Read more

Forget Me Not

By Greg Richter | October 14, 2014 | Comments DSC_9129

Alzheimer’s disease is the sixth leading cause of death in the United States and the fourth leading cause of death among African Americans. Once patients have the disease, there is no treatment available that can stop its progression. The Penn Memory Center seeks to change that. Last month, the Penn... Read more

How a Fish-Killing Natural Product Opens Doors to the Basics of Cell Metabolism

By Karen Kreeger | October 1, 2014 | Comments Blair Rotenone pic Oct 14

Rotenone exposure is also associated with Parkinson’s disease (PD) in humans, but the exact mechanism is unknown. In fact, rotenone is used to induce a rodent model of PD. Mitochondrial abnormalities have been well documented in PD patients, often coinciding with elevated markers of oxidative stress. Despite this evidence, not much is known about how nerve cells die because of the stress. Read more

Whole Genome Sequencing of Amish Families Reveals Complexity of Bipolar Disorder

By Karen Kreeger | September 16, 2014 | Comments Lonestar

Perelman School genetics professor Maja Bucan, PhD, told me of her deep appreciation for the work going on at the clinic: “From my first visit to the clinic [Clinic for Special Children], I knew I wanted to be part of their team as a collaborator.” Read more

Catching up with Edna Foa: From OCD to Her Latest Degree

By Lee-Ann Donegan | September 12, 2014 | Comments GEO_2561

Last month, Edna Foa, world renowned for being the creator of prolonged exposure therapy, a treatment for post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) whereby patients revisit the traumatic event in order to help them heal, received her second honorary doctorate degree for her work in psychiatry—a career that spans four decades.... Read more

Making the Summer Count

By Karen Kreeger | August 15, 2014 | Comments SUIP_Poster Session_1

Every summer, the news is filled with profiles of summer student programs, and those that are aimed at increased participation by minority students in STEM are no exception. The Summer Undergraduate Internship Program at Penn Medicine is one such program. Read more

Robots – Hi-Tech Help or Freaky Fiction?

By Olivia Fermano | August 10, 2014 | Comments image from http://s3.amazonaws.com/hires.aviary.com/k/mr6i2hifk4wxt1dp/14080820/612efab5-13b5-4786-b3a5-4e61fcc0285e.png

Robots cause a polarizing effect in the minds of people. We only have to look to Hollywood to illustrate this. They’re either portrayed as endearing characters like Star Wars’ C-3PO and R2D2 and the adorably-animated WALL-E – or they’re killing machines as seen in Terminator and iRobot. The fact is... Read more

A Picture Really is Worth 1000 Words

By Karen Kreeger | August 1, 2014 | Comments Talamas winning image 2014

The winners of the Penn Medicine 2014 “Art in Science" can certainly make pretty pictures with fancy microscopes, but there is also a rich story of scientific inquiry behind each. Read more

2014 Philadelphia Science Festival Recap

By Karen Kreeger | May 20, 2014 | Comments

It’s only been a little over two weeks since the end of the 2014 Philadelphia Science Festival, but the inspiration, as well as love and knowledge of science that Penn Medicine faculty, staff, and students shared with members of the public, will last far into the next year.

Cycling for Rare Diseases

By Karen Kreeger | May 1, 2014 | Comments image from http://s3.amazonaws.com/hires.aviary.com/k/mr6i2hifk4wxt1dp/14061615/ea083ced-d221-4295-800d-0e745dcaf7ba.png

The first annual Million Dollar Bike Ride is finally here. On Saturday, May 3, 2014, close to 500 riders and many other volunteers and family members will gather at Highline Park on Penn’s campus to raise funds for and awareness about rare diseases. Read more

Sleep the Night Away with Penn Med Scientists at the Philadelphia Science Festival

By Karen Kreeger | April 29, 2014 | Comments PSF sleep blog post image

Sleep -- elusive to some, mysterious to all -- is the topic of a special event at Franklin Institute’s Fels Planetarium on Wednesday, April 30, at 6:30 p.m. called Sleep: A Bedtime Story, part of the signature programs on the 2014 Philadelphia Science Festival schedule.

An Outdoor Kickoff to the Philadelphia Science Festival

By Karen Kreeger | April 23, 2014 | Comments Sci Fest logo outside

Head outdoors this weekend with Penn Medicine to kick off the fourth annual Philadelphia Science Festival.The weather for Saturday and Sunday is predicted to be 0% showers, with highs in the upper 60s and low 70s. Join Penn Medicine faculty, students, and staff at two of the city’s most spectacular...

No Magic Number - Penn Medicine Researcher to Be Among Architects of New National Sleep Recommendations

By Jessica Mikulski | April 8, 2014 | Comments image from http://s3.amazonaws.com/hires.aviary.com/k/mr6i2hifk4wxt1dp/14040813/5d9df654-4164-420e-8d13-d2ec60b7aabb.png

We’ve all heard it before…“sleep experts recommend you get 7 – 8 hours of sleep per night for optimal health.” But is that true for everyone? The answer is there really is no magic number. “For years, members of the sleep research and clinical community have been discussing the issue... Read more

Penn Medicine at the 2014 Philadelphia Science Festival

By Karen Kreeger | April 4, 2014 | Comments PSF 2011 Carnival Dry ice

PSF 2011 Carnival Dry icePenn Medicine will again play a starring role in the 4th annual Philadelphia Science Festival, a citywide collaboration showcasing science and technology every spring. Read more

Relieving the Burden

By Lee-Ann Donegan | March 26, 2014 | Comments

It sounds like a provocative idea for a health care practitioner: Frank Leone, MD, MS, and his team call themselves “pro-smoker.” That’s because smoking, he says, is a disease – one that should be treated with compassion and evidence-based therapies like any other. “Getting people to quit is good for... Read more

Beyond the Ivory Tower: Penn’s Neuroscience Grad Students Reach Out During Brain Week, and Beyond

By Karen Kreeger | March 18, 2014 | Comments NGG KidsJudge 2013 Synpatic Land

Philadelphia is a cerebral city this spring. To start, every March, Brain Awareness Week brings together institutions worldwide to celebrate the brain. Read more

Transcription Factors Key to Using T Cells Against Cancer, Chronic Infection

By Karen Kreeger | March 6, 2014 | Comments Wherry BATF spiral blog post Mar 14

Business is brisk in the lab of John Wherry and his team from the Department of Microbiology and the Institute for Immunology for papers on killer and helper T cells. Two studies -- bound by their focus on transcription factors important in the immune response – have come out of the lab in the last few weeks. And, they both identify potential new targets for cancer immunotherapies. Read more

Obscure Neurologic Diseases Discovered at Penn to be Focus of New Center

By Kim Menard | January 29, 2014 | Comments

The Penn team that discovered a series of related conditions involving autoimmune responses impairing neurological function is taking the program one step further by opening the Penn Center for Autoimmune Neurology. Read more

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