Penn Medicine News Blog Archive: Aging

No Magic Number - Penn Medicine Researcher to Be Among Architects of New National Sleep Recommendations

image from http://s3.amazonaws.com/hires.aviary.com/k/mr6i2hifk4wxt1dp/14040813/5d9df654-4164-420e-8d13-d2ec60b7aabb.png
We’ve all heard it before…“sleep experts recommend you get 7 – 8 hours of sleep per night for optimal health.” But is that true for everyone? The answer is there really is no magic number. “For years, members of the sleep research and clinical community have been discussing the issue...

Pocket-sized Medicine: Bringing Real-time Tests to Homebound Patients

image from http://s3.amazonaws.com/hires.aviary.com/k/mr6i2hifk4wxt1dp/14040219/b1f163cf-ed1d-4f1b-af44-607ce8dc1b36.png
Thanks to innovations that have miniaturized medical devices, care providers on the go - from home care visits to busy outpatient practices - can get more and more real-time feedback at the patient's bedside.

Beyond the Ivory Tower: Penn’s Neuroscience Grad Students Reach Out During Brain Week, and Beyond

NGG KidsJudge 2013 Synpatic Land
Philadelphia is a cerebral city this spring. To start, every March, Brain Awareness Week brings together institutions worldwide to celebrate the brain.

Memory May Fade with Dementia, but Artistic Abilities and Benefits Carry On

image from http://aviary.blob.core.windows.net/k-mr6i2hifk4wxt1dp-14012016/3cf16bf8-7ddb-4dfa-857b-ca584c507608.png
Since it is possible for Alzheimer's patients to create art, researchers are investigating whether art therapy improves symptoms or quality of life. A new review of studies assessing art interventions from Perelman School of Medicine researchers found that art creation and appreciation activities may improve Alzheimer's disease patients' mood, activities of daily living, quality of life, and even caregiver distress.

The Consequences of Beauty

More and more people are seeking out medical procedures to improve their appearance - over 12 million facial cosmetic procedures are performed each year in the United States alone - but how does it impact their self confidence, or their quality of life?

Penn Community Comes Together for 2nd Annual 5K for the IOA and Memory Mile Walk

_db17305
It was a perfect fall morning - sunny and 62 - for the second annual Penn 5K for the IOA and Memory Mile Walk on September 22, 2013. Nearly 300 walkers and runners, ranging from 3 years old to 90 years old, turned out some fast times on the new race course through Penn Park, with skyline views of Center City.

5 Things to “Remember” About Alzheimer’s Disease

Neurological diseases are a bit intimidating to talk about – the last time most of us thought about axons and neurotransmitters, we were in high school biology – so in an effort to make the science a little easier to digest, we're going to make an effort to start trying...

Tackling the Cancer and Aging Conundrum

IMG_9365
Penn’s Institute on Aging recently co-hosted its annual Sylvan M. Cohen lecture and poster session. This year, in partnership with the Abramson Cancer Center‘s Tumor Biology Program, the event focused on “protecting the genome in the longevity revolution: cancer and aging.” Brian Duke, Pennsylvania Secretary for Aging, set the stage...

Tau is its Own Worst Enemy

Cohen Nature Struct Mol Bio Blog post schematic Apr 13
In an update to recent research, Todd Cohen, Virginia Lee, and the Penn CNDR team have found an unusual behavior in the protein tau. It is literally its own worst enemy - tau is actually an enzyme that adds an acetyl group to itself, a process called autoacetylation.

Penn Med at the 2013 Philadelphia Science Festival

PSF logo 2013
Penn Medicine will play a starring role in the Philadelphia Science Festival again this year. The Festival is a citywide collaboration showcasing science and technology every April. This year it runs from April 19 - 28, 10 days to celebrate the region’s strengths in science and technology, bringing together more than 100 partners from academia to museums to restaurants.

Penn Medicine CAREs Grant Helps Bring Healthy Living Education to Seniors

PAH Pharm CAREs gran recips pic
Officially our nation’s first hospital, Pennsylvania Hospital has been a stalwart pillar of its surrounding Philadelphia community since its founding in 1751. No wonder than, with over two and a half centuries of history and continuous service behind it, the hospital inspires its employees to “give back” to the community....

Lasso It Up: How a Rodeo Roping Technique Can Help Treat an Age-old Heart Ailment

Cowboy Lasso Image
To celebrate February as American Heart Month, the News Blog is highlighting some of the latest heart-centric news and stories from all areas of Penn Medicine. At first pass, lariat seems like just a hifalutin' word for the more down-to-earth, lasso – a long, noosed rope. For most, either word...

New Procedure Aims to Lower Treatment-resistant Hypertension

Heart stethescope via stock.xchange
Penn Medicine is the first in the region to begin testing a new procedure to help people whose high blood pressure can't be controlled using currently available medications.

The Many Faces of Metformin

Metformin blog post goat's rue Jan 13
Metformin, the most widely prescribed diabetes drug, has come full circle from a home remedy in the European medieval apothecary called goat’s rue to now being investigated for a host of modern chronic conditions.

Incremental Clarity in Neurodegenerative Diseases

In December and early January, years of neurological research unfolded in a few weeks time as papers published the work of Penn researchers and were able to deepen our understanding of a variety of conditions, both rare and common, hopefully getting closer to refining or finding effective treatments as a result.

Penn Medicine 2012 Year in Review

Yearinreview
Taking a look back, 2012 has been a year marked by breakthroughs in medical research, system-wide growth, and landmark philanthropic support for Penn Medicine. As we set our sights on the year ahead, we also celebrate the past year's accomplishments and give thanks to the outstanding faculty, staff, and students...

Early Observations: A Hospice Volunteer’s Journey

Family Room - Penn Hospice @ Rittenhouse
Last month, I wrote a post in anticipation of starting the training necessary to become a volunteer with Penn Wissahickon Hospice. Since that time, I’ve completed training to become an inpatient hospice greeter and actually volunteered twice. Although it’s still very early on in my experience, I think I’ve gleaned a few insights that I wanted to share.

Image Wizardry: Penn Med’s Prize-Winning Algorithm Speeds Radiologic Testing Process

PICSL-MICCAI-2012
Modern day medical imaging exams have become a critical diagnostic tool for conditions of all kinds – from detecting the earliest breast cancers, long before a tumor could grow large enough for a woman to feel a lump in her own body, to finding malformations in the hearts of tiny...

A New Use for an Existing Technology Improves the Lives of Incontinence Sufferers

Life is full of embarrassing moments. Who among us hasn’t suffered the mild mortification of unknowingly walking around with toilet paper trailing from a shoe? Or an unzipped fly? How many of us know what it’s like to emerge from an underwater dive only to discover that part of our...

Collective Hope for Alzheimer’s at Annual Meeting

It's becoming more and more common to find out a relative or friend has to leave his/her job to care for a loved one with Alzheimer's disease. Just yesterday, I heard about a colleague who is facing this difficult situation. In fact, the Alzheimer’s Association estimates in 2011, 15.2 million...

Subscribe to Penn Medicine News Blog by Email

Search

Categories

About This Blog